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Cyber Bullying

Understanding the Megan Meier Case

Understanding the Megan Meier Case

Megan Meier and Cyber-Bullying
Megan Meier was a 13-year-old girl who had attended the Immaculate Conception Middle School in Dardenne Prairie, Missouri. She took her own life shortly before her 14th birthday as a result of what was deemed bullying taking place over the Internet, or ‘Cyber-Bullying’.
Megan Meier is considered to be amongst the first cases of suicide resulting from Cyber-Bullying in the United States of America. However, in contrast to a large majority of Cyber-Bullying cases that has followed Meier’s case, in which the bullying is typically undertaken by fellow peers and classmates, Lori Drew, who was the parent of a fellow student, was charged with masterminding the bullying of Megan Meier.
What is Cyber-Bullying?
Cyber-Bullying is an act of harassment and abuse that takes place within a digital setting, which most commonly is classified as Internet or Online-based forums. This type of verbal, emotional debasement directed at the victim is a nature of abuse that can come from both acquaintances of the victim, as well as individuals who have never met the victim. 
Due to the fact that the act of Cyber-Bullying is inherent within a virtual, digital realm, Cyber-Bullying can take place through the implementation of a vast array of media, including text, pictures, and videos.

Who was Megan Meier?

Megan Meier took her own life on October 17th, 2006. She was 13 years old.


Case Details of Megan Meier’s Suicide

The following information details the events that transpired both leading up to the suicide of Megan Meier, as well as the after-effects of Megan Meier’s suicide:
Upon moving from O’Fallon, Missouri to Dardenne Prairie, Missouri, where she had been a childhood friend of the daughter of Lori Drew, Megan Meier had informed the daughter of Lori Drew that she no longer wished to be acquainted with her. Lori Drew suspected that Megan Meier was gossiping about her daughter to her fellow students.
As a result, Lori Drew, along with an individual under her employ, undertook Cyber-Bullying efforts directed at Megan Meier through which they posed as a 16-year-old boy in order to forge a relationship with Megan Meier. Throughout this fraudulent relationship, Lori Drew obtained a multitude of personal information about Megan Meier. Drew had planned to humiliate Megan Meier with this acquired information.
Upon the completion of her Cyber-Bullying efforts, Lori Drew, posing as a 16-year-old boy, suggested that Megan Meier take her own life. Megan Meier, who was diagnosed with depression and attention deficit disorder, complied.
United States v. Lori Drew


Lori Drew was charged for the death of Megan Meier as a result of her participation in Cyber-Bullying efforts considered to be responsible for Meier’s death. In addition, Ashley Grills, the 18-year-old employee of Drew, was called to testify in the case. However, the verdict rendered acquitted Lori Drew of her contribution to the death of Megan Meier.

Assistance for Victims of Cyber-Bullying
Individuals who have been the victims of Cyber-Bullying, as well as those who have been made aware of events of Cyber-Bullying, are encouraged to contact the National Crime Prevention Council through their telephone number: (202) 466-6272. In the event that an individual wishes not to be named, reports of Cyber-Bullying can be conducted anonymously.
Cyber-Bullying is a very real and growing concern within modernity and the tragic events that befell Megan Meier do not have to be repeated. There is help available – no one ever deserves to be victimized. 

Who is Seth Walsh

Who is Seth Walsh

Seth Walsh and Cyber-Bullying
Seth Walsh was a 13-year-old student who attended the Jacobsen Middle School in Tehachapi, California. Due to the fact that Seth Walsh  was an admitted homosexual, he became the target of bullying, both in school, as well as through the Internet. 
As a result of ridicule by fellow classmates, both through verbal abuse, as well as online slander and harassment, Seth Walsh took his own life by hanging himself from a tree in the backyard of his home.
What is Cyber-Bullying?
Cyber-Bullying is an act of harassment and abuse that takes place within a digital setting, which most commonly is classified as Internet or Online-based forums. This type of verbal, emotional debasement directed at the victim is a nature of abuse that can come from both acquaintances of the victim, as well as individuals who have never met the victim. Due to the fact that the act of Cyber-Bullying is inherent within a virtual, digital realm, Cyber-Bullying can take place through the implementation of a vast array of media, including text, pictures, and videos.

Who was Seth Walsh?

Seth Walsh took his own life on September 9th, 2010. He was 13 years old.
Case Details of Seth Walsh’s Suicide

The following information details the events that transpired both leading up to the suicide of Seth Walsh, as well as the after-effects of Seth Walsh’s suicide:
Subsequent to what was reported as merciless bullying, Seth Walsh chose to end his life. However, prior to his death, he was discovered and rushed to the emergency room where he remained in critical condition for almost 10 days until the life support system was rendered unable to keep Walsh alive.
Although many reports have surfaced with regard to the abuse suffered by Seth Walsh, no formal charges were filed with regard to the perpetrators of his bullying.
Cyber-Bullying and the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBT) Community
The LGBT Community is an advocacy group operating as a Civil Rights group in order to both protect and preserve the unalienable rights afforded to citizens who classify themselves as homosexual. With regard to Seth Walsh’s tragic suicide and the existence of hate-based bullying and intimidation, the LGBT Community serves as a means of protection against inequity and injustices suffered upon them as a result of undue prejudice, bias, and hate.
The LGBT Community not only offers resources and assistance to those individuals victimized by Cyber-Bullying, but also undertakes lobbying endeavors in order to ensure that the fate of Seth Walsh is not repeated.


Assistance for Victims of Cyber-Bullying

Individuals who have been the victims of Cyber-Bullying, as well as those who have been made aware of events of Cyber-Bullying, are encouraged to contact the National Crime Prevention Council through their telephone number: (202) 466-6272. In the event that an individual wishes not to be named, reports of Cyber-Bullying can be conducted anonymously.
Cyber-Bullying is a very real and growing concern within modernity and the tragic events that befell Seth Walsh do not have to be repeated. There is help available – no one ever deserves to be victimized. 

Understanding the Tyler Clementi Case

Understanding the Tyler Clementi Case

Tyler Clementi and Cyber-Bullying
Tyler Clementi was a college student at Rutgers University in the State of New Jersey who was the victim of Cyber-Bullying as a result of his sexual orientation. Tyler Clementi, a homosexual, was unknowingly videotaped by his college roommate, Dharun Ravi, in the midst of engaging in sexual activity with an unnamed male partner.
Dharun Ravi had not only videotaped Tyler Clementi, violating his privacy in the process, but also broadcasted the footage of Tyler Clementi and his partner to fellow students. 
Dharun Ravi not only videotaped Tyler Clementi on more than one occasion, but also publicized Clementi’s sexual activity. Upon the filing of multiple complaints to his Resident Advisor about Dharun Ravi’s behavior, Clementi maintained that no recourse was offered. As a result, Tyler Clementi took his own life.
What is Cyber-Bullying?

Cyber-Bullying is an act of harassment and abuse that takes place within a digital setting, most commonly classified as Internet or Online-based forums. This type of verbal, emotional debasement directed at the victim is a nature of abuse that can come from both acquaintances of the victim, as well as individuals who have never met the victim. Due to the fact that the act of Cyber-Bullying is inherent within a virtual, digital realm, Cyber-Bullying can take place through the implementation of a vast array of media, including text, pictures, and videos.
Who was Tyler Clementi?

Tyler Clementi took his own life on September 22nd, 2010. Upon leaving a message on his Facebook page explaining that he was planning to take his own life, he jumped to his death from the George Washington Bridge in Manhattan, New York. He was 18 years old.
Case Details of Tyler Clementi’s Suicide

The following information details the events that transpired both leading up to the suicide of Tyler Clementi, as well as the after-effects of Tyler Clementi’s suicide:
On September 19th, 2010, Dharun Ravi both publicizes and broadcasts illegally-captured videos of Tyler Clementi to fellow students for the first time;
On September 21st, 2010, Dharun Ravi both publicizes and broadcasts illegally-captured videos of Tyler Clementi to fellow students for the second time;


Applicable Criminal Charges

In addition to the charge of Cyber-Bullying, both Dharun Ravi and Molly Wei, an accomplice of Ravi, are accused of the following charges:
●  Committing a Hate Crime through the enactment of criminal activity resulting from prejudice and bias;
●  Online Trespass and the violation of privacy laws;
Cyber-Bullying and the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBT) Community
The LGBT Community is an advocacy group operating as a Civil Rights group in order to both protect and preserve the unalienable rights afforded to citizens who classify themselves as homosexual. With regard to Tyler Clementi’s tragic suicide and the existence of hate-based bullying and intimidation, the LGBT Community serves a means of protection against inequity and injustices suffered upon them as a result of undue prejudice, bias, and hate.
The LGBT Community not only offers resources and assistance to those individuals victimized by Cyber-Bullying, but also undertakes lobbying endeavors in order to ensure that the fate of Tyler Clementi is not repeated.

Assistance for Victims of Cyber-Bullying
Individuals who have been the victims of Cyber-Bullying, as well as those who have been made aware of events of Cyber-Bullying, are encouraged to contact the National Crime Prevention Council through their telephone number: (202) 466-6272. In the event that an individual wishes not to be named, reports of Cyber-Bullying can be conducted anonymously.
Cyber-Bullying is a very real and growing concern within modernity and the tragic events that befell Tyler Clementi do not have to be repeated. There is help available; no one ever deserves to be victimized. 

4 Types of Preventative Cyber-Bullying Articles You Must Read

4 Types of Preventative Cyber-Bullying Articles You Must Read

What are Cyber-Bullying Articles?


Cyber-Bullying Articles are text, speech, or video-based publications that address Cyber-Bullying, which is defined as abuse or harassment that takes place within a virtual or digital setting primarily over the Internet. Cyber-Bullying can include the facilitation of social networking, electronic mail (E-Mail), or ‘Chat Rooms’ in order to undertake that activity.
The rise of the release of Cyber-Bullying Articles has taken place in tandem with the growing rate of Cyber-Bullying taking place within modernity, as well as the tragic effects that it has rendered with regard to children and minors. Currently, individuals below the age of legal adulthood are considered to be the primary targets of Cyber-Bullying.
Cyber-Bullying Articles Addressing the Various Types of Cyber-
Bullying
Cyber-Bullying Articles dealing with abuse and harassment taking place within virtual settings include insight and exploration of the varying types of Cyber-Bullying, defined as the illegal and unlawful abuse of individuals, as well as unwelcomed virtual harmful or damaging interaction with computer users. These Cyber-Bullying Articles may include the provision of information contribution to the prevention of the following:
The unlawful seizure of personal data belonging to others in order to facilitate extortive measures. This type of harassment – ranging from sexual to physical in nature – is an intrusive method of Cyber-Bullying latent with methodological, threatening, or sociopathic tendencies in order to abuse and harass another.
Cyber-Bullying Articles Addressing the Various Media within Cyber-Bullying

Cyber-Bullying Articles, which include the various criminal activities undertaken in order to commit Cyber-Bullying, may include harassment. Media – including pictures, text, or video – may result in the exploitation and subsequent manipulation of another individual or entity through otherwise legal means, such as the threat to release private media, documents, or information.


Cyber-Bullying Articles Addressing the Legality of Cyber-Bullying

Cyber-Bullying Articles addressing the legislation employed within the classification of online-based crime can take place in a variety of methods. This legal field is classified as Cyber Law. The Cyber Law precepts mandate Cyber-Bullying taking place through the facilitation of a computer terminal or electronic communicative network.
Upon the receipt of a claim or report of alleged Cyber-Bullying, the decorum, legality, ethics, nature, and behavior will undergo analysis. Due to the fact that the advent of the internet, as well as the multitude of virtual incarnations of endeavors once considered specific to the physical world, the legal fields and tenets are in constant evolution. Cyber-Bullying Articles can assist in not only the filing of such claims, but may also serve to provide assistance with legal action.


Cyber-Bullying Articles Addressing the Effects of Cyber-Bullying

Cyber-Bullying Articles elucidating the tragic and dramatic effects that Cyber-Bullying may have on a victim include a wide range of mental and emotional disorders identified as direct effects of Cyber-Bullying, including the development of emotional and mental disorders ranging from depression to self-harm. In the event of alleged Cyber-Bullying activities, individuals are encouraged to contact the National Crime Prevention Council through their telephone number: (202) 466-6272.

A Guide to Cyber-Bullying Facts

A Guide to Cyber-Bullying Facts

What are Cyber-Bullying Facts?

The rise of the release of Cyber-Bullying Facts have taken place in tandem with the growing rate of Cyber-Bullying taking place within modernity, as well as the tragic effects that it has rendered with regard to children and minors. Currently, individuals below the age(s) of legal adulthood are considered to be the primary targets of Cyber-Bullying.
Cyber-Bullying is an act of harassment and abuse that takes place within a digital setting, most commonly classified as Internet or Online-based forums. Due to the fact that the act of Cyber-Bullying is inherent to a virtual realm, Cyber-Bullying Facts elucidating not only the growth of Cyber-Bullying, but also its effects, are set forth by various advocacy groups in order to prevent the proliferation of this crime.
Cyber-Bullying Facts #1 

The following Cyber-Bullying Facts address the frequency and statistics:
Cyber-Bullying Facts state that almost 50% of children have been the victims of some nature of Cyber-Bullying. The primary demographic of the victims of Cyber-Bullying are those below the age of legal adulthood.
Cyber-Bullying Facts state that children between the age(s) of 11 and 13 are amongst the most common victims of Cyber-Bullying. Statistics reflect that upwards of 90% of children between these ages have been victims of Cyber-Bullying.
Females are considered to be approximately 50% more likely to be victims of Cyber-Bullying than males.
In recent studies, Cyber-Bullying Facts released illustrating the rise of Cyber-Bullying between the years 2009 and 2010 maintain that the rate of Cyber-Bullying has grown upwards of 50%.

Cyber-Bullying Facts #2
The following Cyber-Bullying Facts address the methods and actions:
Cyber-Bullying Facts state that almost 75% of Cyber-Bullying taking place occurred through the undertaking of abuse on the part of the Cyber-bully. The second most common form of Cyber-Bullying takes place through the exclusion or shunning from an online community.
Almost 50% of children who have been victims of Cyber-Bullying have maintained that the illegal and unlawful access of personal information, including the online trespass into their personal accounts, has taken place. This includes the fraudulent usage of email addresses, passwords, and social networking profiles.
Cyber-Bullying taking place within ‘chat rooms’ accounts for almost 60% of electronic communication-based Cyber-Bullying. Upwards of 20% of the victims of Cyber-Bullying have reported the receipt of threats, abuse, and harassment through E-mail-based communication. 
Cyber-Bullying taking place through the use of social networking websites is considered to have affected almost 60% of children between the age(s) of 10 and 17. Within this statistic, the victims state that they have been the target of Cyber-Bullying more than one time.

Cyber-Bullying Facts #3

The Following Cyber-Bullying Facts address methods to get help:
In the event you or someone you know has been, or is currently, the victim of Cyber-Bullying, you are encouraged to contact the following resources:
The National Cyber Alert System, which is sponsored by the United States Department of Homeland Security.
Individuals are also encouraged to contact the National Crime Prevention Council through their telephone number: (202) 466-6272.
Remember, Cyber-Bullying is considered to be a crime of both an abusive and harassing nature. Neither you nor anyone else is required to undergo any nature of abuse. 

Your Guide to Understanding Cyber Bullying in Schools

Your Guide to Understanding Cyber Bullying in Schools

What is Cyber-Bullying in Schools?
Cyber-Bullying in Schools is classified as a harassing or insulting act that takes place as a result of the expression of abusive statements, expression, or actions undertaken by one individual to another individual through the implementation of electronic, virtual, and ‘online’-based means. 
As its classification suggests, Cyber-Bullying in Schools takes place within an educational institution. The classification of the school in which Cyber-Bullying may take place ranges from Elementary Schools to Universities.
The grouping of a large amount of children, young adults, or teenagers within an encapsulated area is considered to attribute to manifestation of a wide variety of social dynamics. While the participation in scholastic programs account for academic and social enrichment, the existence of Cyber-Bullying in Schools is considered to be both a tragic and damaging byproduct of scholastic institutions. 


Bullying in Schools vs. Cyber-Bullying in Schools

Although the bulk of scholastic institutions will typically regulate and monitor, as well as limit, the individual computer usage undertaken by the students in attendance, a large majority of Cyber-Bullying in Schools takes place subsequent to the end of the school day. 
Social networking websites, as well as Internet ‘chats’, which are defined as programs allowing for virtual, interpersonal correspondence, promote the sharing and communication of speech, text, expression, and media within the respective realm of these activities.
Statistics released in the beginning of 2011 illustrate that both the usage and the collective reliance on social networking media websites undertaken by students has never been more prominent and unrivaled throughout the technological history of the United States of America.

Analytical Facts of Cyber-Bullying in Schools

The following facts illustrate the victims, activity, and nature involved in Cyber-Bullying in Schools:
Statistics show that the most common victims of Cyber-Bullying in Schools are between the ages of 11 and 13 years. Almost 90% of children between 11 and 13 years of age have reported victimization of Cyber-Bullying. However, the span of Cyber-Bullying in Schools is in no way limited to Middle Schools.
Almost 10% of university students have reported victimization as a result of  Cyber-Bullying in Schools. In October of 2010, Tyler Clementi, a student at Rutgers University in New Jersey, took his own life as a result of his victimization at the hands of bullies. 
Cyber-Bullying Statistics explain that female children are almost 50% more likely to become victimized by Cyber-Bullying than their male counterparts. While reports show that male-targeted Cyber-Bullying in Schools typically results in physical attack and assault, female victims are most commonly bullied through the use of the Internet.
Assistance for Victims of Cyber-Bullying in Schools

Individuals who have been the victims of Cyber-Bullying in Schools, as well as those who have been made aware of events of Cyber-Bullying in Schools, are encouraged to contact the National Crime Prevention Council through their telephone number: (202) 466-6272. In the event that an individual wishes not to be named, reports of Cyber-Bullying can be conducted anonymously.
Cyber-Bullying Statistics (2010) demonstrate that Cyber-Bullying is a very real and growing concern within modernity. These tragic events do not have to be repeated because help is available. No one deserves to be victimized. 

4 Important Facts about Cyber Bullying Laws

4 Important Facts about Cyber Bullying Laws

Cyber-Bullying Laws Explained
Cyber-Bullying Laws are statutory legislation enacted in order to combat the damage and devastation resulting from the abuse and harassment latent within Cyber-Bullying. Cyber-Bullying is defined as a criminal act in which individuals are targeted and victimized by a wide range of malicious, damaging, and demeaning activity undertaken through the usage of the Internet and online networks.
Due to the growing reliance on an online, virtual setting for the provision of not only commercial activity, but social activity as well, legislative adjustments and developments have been enacted in order to provide substantial means of deterrence and cessation of Cyber-Bullying.


The Legal Field of Cyber-Bullying Laws
Cyber-Bullying Laws exist within the legal parameters of Cyber Law, which is also known as ‘Computer Law’ or ‘Internet Law’. The field of Cyber Law is identified as the legal jurisdiction responsible for the prosecution of Cyber-Bullying charges facilitated through the usage of electronic networks and technologically-based communication systems relying on the Internet as a means of utility. Cyber-Bullying Laws ensure that individuals undertaking the use of the Internet do so only in conjunction with legal, ethical, and moral means.
Types of Cyber-Bullying Laws
Due to the vast expanse of bullying currently taking place, both within physical sectors, as well as within virtual sectors, Cyber-Bullying Laws enacted in order to preserve and protect the rights of the victims affected by Cyber-Bullying are subject to variation.


Local Cyber-Bullying Laws
Individual school districts are granted the autonomy to formulate their own respective Cyber-Bullying Laws. Although these laws are not considered to be viable legislation, the adherence to standards and practices of decorum within individual schools are considered to be requirements for the students in attendance. In many cases, individual school districts will host community meetings in order to discuss prospective methodology that may be undertaken in order to be of assistance to the provision and protection of the safety and well-being of the student body.

Cyber-Bullying Laws by State
As recent as February of 2011, upwards of 35 States within the United States of America have enacted Bullying Laws. Although these laws are not expressly set forth with regard to jurisdiction of bullying taking place within the digital, virtual sector, many Cyber-Bullying offenses are addressed within their respective statutes.
As of February of 2011, upwards of 15 States have enacted Cyber-Bullying Laws, which only include statutory legislation with regard to bullying taking place through both the usage of online networks and the Internet.

Federal Cyber-Bullying Laws
The ‘Megan Meier Cyber-Bullying Prevention Act’ was passed by Congress in April of 2009, making it the first Federal Cyber-Bullying Law passed in the United States of America. The Bill was passed a s a result of Megan Meier’s suicide in 2006.
Megan Meier is considered to be amongst the first cases of suicide resulting from Cyber-Bullying within the United States of America. She was habitually Cyber-Bullied through the use of a social networking website.
Cyber-Bullying Laws and Legal Recourse

Individuals who have been the victims of Cyber-Bullying, as well as those who have been made aware of events of Cyber-Bullying, are encouraged to contact the National Crime Prevention Council through their telephone number: (202) 466-6272. In the event that an individual wishes not to be named, reports of Cyber-Bullying can be conducted anonymously. 

Cyber-Bullying Statistics (2010) that You Must Know

Cyber-Bullying Statistics (2010) that You Must Know

What are Cyber-Bullying Statistics (2010)?
Cyber-Bullying is the harassment and abuse undertaken within a virtual, ‘online’-based  setting, most commonly classified in conjunction with facilitation of Internet or the utilization of digital, interpersonal correspondence. The foremost Cyber-Bullying Statistics (2010) explain that the implicit nature of Cyber-Bullying is inherent to the Cyber, or electronic, realm.
Cyber-Bullying Statistics are released in order to elucidate the growth of Cyber-Bullying, but also its effects, as well as the varying natures of methodology latent within Cyber-Bullying. Cyber-Bullying Statistics are set forth by various advocacy groups in order to prevent the spread of Cyber-Bullying.
Secondly, Cyber-Bullying Statistics (2010) released conveyed that the tragic effects of this crime on children and minors, who are individuals considered to be below the age of legal adulthood, who are considered to be the primary targets of Cyber-Bullying.


Demographical Cyber-Bullying Statistics (2010) 
With regard to the both frequency and inherent nature of Cyber-Bullying, information offered through the release of Cyber-Bullying Statistics (2010) elucidate the alarming facts latent within the analysis and investigation of Cyber-Bullying offenses.
Cyber-Bullying Statistics (2010) state that children between the ages of 11 and 13 years old are amongst the most common victims of Cyber-Bullying. Upwards of 90% of children between these ages have been victims of Cyber-Bullying.
Cyber-Bullying Statistics (2010) state that upwards of 30% of children have been the victims of Cyber-Bullying. This statistic accounts for almost 6 million children reported to have been victims of Cyber-Bullying.
Amongst the most common targets of Cyber-Bullying reported within Cyber-Bullying Statistics (2010) include children who are presumed to be or are admittedly homosexual, as well as children considered to be obese. Children considered to be obese are 60% more likely to be bullied, while gay or lesbian children are 30% more likely to be victimized by bullying.
Cyber-Bullying Statistics (2010) explain that females are twice as likely to be the victims of bullying than their male counterparts.

Locational Cyber-Bullying Statistics (2010) 
The following Cyber-Bullying Statistics (2010) demonstrate Cyber-Bullying as per the location in which they are reported:
Cyber-Bullying Statistics (2010) state that approximately 20% of children within the United States have been the victims of Cyber-Bullying.
Almost 20% of children residing within the United States have admitted to the bullying of fellow children.
Within the United States, Cyber-Bullying befalling males most commonly include physical attacks and assaults, while females have reported bullying specific to them to take place within the setting of the Internet.
Assistance for Victims of Cyber-Bullying

Individuals who have been the victims of Cyber-Bullying, as well as those who have been made aware of events of Cyber-Bullying, are encouraged to contact the National Crime Prevention Council through their telephone number: (202) 466-6272. In the event that an individual wishes not to be named, reports of Cyber-Bullying can be conducted anonymously. Cyber-Bullying Statistics (2010) demonstrate that Cyber-Bullying is a very real and growing concern within modernity. These tragic events do not have to be repeated.

What are the Most Shocking Cyber Bullying Statistics

What are the Most Shocking Cyber Bullying Statistics

What are Cyber-Bullying Statistics?
Cyber-Bullying is an act of harassment and abuse that takes place within a digital setting, most commonly classified as Internet or Online-based forums. Due to the fact that the act of Cyber-Bullying is inherent to a virtual realm, Cyber-Bullying Statistics are released in order to elucidate the growth of Cyber-Bullying, but also its effects, as well as the varying natures of methodology latent within Cyber-Bullying, are set forth by various advocacy groups in order to prevent the spread of Cyber-Bullying.
Perhaps the most shocking Cyber-Bullying Statistics released convey the tragic effects of this crime on children and minors, classified as individuals below the age(s) of legal adulthood. Cyber-Bullying Statistics demonstrate that children are considered to be the primary targets of Cyber-Bullying. 

Cyber-Bullying Statistics with regard to the Victims’ Ages and Stature

Due to the fact that the age(s) of the victims of Cyber-Bullying exist in what is considered to be ‘mid-developmental stages’, the effects of Cyber-Bullying is considered to pose great threats to the emotional well-being of its victims. The following Cyber-Bullying Statistics exist with regard to the age(s) of Cyber-Bullying victims:
Cyber-Bullying taking place through the  use of social networking websites is considered to account for the setting in which the majority of Cyber-Bullying takes place. 60% of children between the age(s) of 10 and 17 have reported instances of Cyber-Bullying through the use of such websites.
Cyber-Bullying Statistics state that children between the age(s) of 11 and 13 are amongst the most common victims of Cyber-Bullying. Statistics reflect that upwards of 90% of children between these ages have been victims of Cyber-Bullying.
Cyber-Bullying Statistics explain that female children are almost 50% more likely to become victimized by Cyber-Bullying than their male counterparts.
Cyber-Bullying Statistics with regard to the Frequency of Victimization
Cyber-Bullying Statistics released have expressed that the trend of Cyber-Bullying has grown almost 50% between the years 2009 and 2010. Advocacy groups and lobbyists maintain that raised awareness and improved preventative measures will greatly reduce the frequency of future Cyber-Bullying.
The following Cyber-Bullying Statistics express the frequency of these events:
Upwards of 40% of children have claimed to be the victims of Cyber-Bullying. In addition, 10% of these victims have reported that they have been victims of Cyber-Bullying in more than one instance.
Almost of 40% of children have claimed to the be the victims of Cyber-Bullying through the implementation of threats posed by Cyber-Bullies. In addition, almost 10% of these victims have reported that they have received threats on more than one occasion.
Cyber-Bullying Statistics explain that upwards of 20% of children have received threats and abusive sentiments through direct correspondence, including E-mail and social networking-hosted correspondence.
Cyber-Bullying Statistics with regard to the Reporting of Offenses

Individuals are encouraged to contact the National Crime Prevention Council through their telephone number: (202) 466-6272.
Cyber-Bullying is considered to be a crime of both an abusive and harassing nature. Neither you nor anyone else is required to undergo any nature of abuse.
Cyber-Bullying Statistics illustrate that within the gross number of victims of Cyber-Bullying, almost 60% of the victims have chosen not to report the Cyber-Bullying in which they were victimized.
Upwards of 50% of children have admitted to engaging in mean or hurtful speech within an online setting.

Why Does the Sharing of Cyber Bullying Stories Help?

Why Does the Sharing of Cyber Bullying Stories Help?

What are Cyber-Bullying Stories?

Cyber-Bullying Stories are recounts of experiences which individuals who have been the victims of Cyber-Bullying may choose to express in order to report the details and circumstances of their respective victimization from abuse and harassment taking place within a virtual setting. The reporting of Cyber-Bullying Stories may take place for a variety of purposes, including the desire to provide a support and assistance for other individuals who have been, or are currently, victims of Cyber-Bullying.
Why Does the Sharing of Cyber-Bullying Stories Help?

Although the implicit nature latent within the vast expanse of Cyber-Bullying Stories varies in nature, severity, and the victims involved, their expression has provided, and continues to provide, support and informational resources with regard to both the proliferation of awareness and preventative measures available in dealing with Cyber-Bullying.
The following facts about Cyber-Bullying illustrate why the exchange of this information is considered to be so valuable:
The primary ages of the victims of Cyber-Bullying are considered to be in the midst of the developmental stage. As a result, the effects of Cyber-Bullying are considered to pose great threats to the emotional well-being of its victims. The exchange and proliferation of Cyber-Bullying Stories may provide both emotional support, as well as informational support to children victimized by Cyber-Bullying.
Cyber-Bullying Stories may be shared within a vast array of forums or settings, which can include lectures, workshops, focus groups, literature, and seminars, all of which may allow for the abuse suffered by victims of Cyber-Bullying to proliferate the awareness of the potential damage latent within each circumstance of Cyber-Bullying.
Types of Cyber-Bullying Stories

Cyber-Bullying Stories may involve a variety of circumstances and events that span the scope of charges and offenses inherent within Cyber-Bullying. Due to the expansive nature of this crime, Cyber-Bullying Stories can range both in nature, as well as the implicit victimization.
Emotional and Psychological Cyber-Bullying Stories will typically include the verbal or emotional debasement of the victim involved, ranging from the issue of threats to the expression of emotional abuse. An example of a victim of this type of Cyber-Bullying is Megan Meir, who tragically took her own life on October 17th, 2006, after being verbally abused online.
Sexual Cyber-Bullying Stories may include victimization resulting from abuse and harassment with regard to personal information, which includes sexual orientation or sexual preference. An example of a victim of this type of Cyber-Bullying is Tyler Clementi, who tragically took his own life on September 22nd, 2010, after his roommate released a video of him, recorded illegally. In the ultimate violation of privacy, this video portrayed Clementi engaging in sexual activity with another male.

Reporting Cyber-Bullying Stories

Due to the ages of the victims, both the emotional and physical effects of Cyber-Bullying are considered as being amongst the most severe. For this reason, Cyber-Bullying Stories may serve as invaluable resources and assistance to other individual victims who are experiencing Cyber-Bullying. However, prior to the sharing of Cyber-Bullying Stories with support groups, victims of Cyber-Bullying are encouraged to report circumstances of which they have been a victim to the National Crime Prevention Council through their telephone number (202) 466-6272 in order to receive immediate help and support.