Facebook Scam with Photo Notification

Facebook Scam with Photo Notification

Share
Facebook Scam with Photo Notification

 

A systemic scam is exposing Facebook users to malware and other computer viruses. This new Facebook scam with Photo Notification is initiated via email; the virus is triggered by an email claiming “one of your friends added a new photo of new you.” When receiving this notification it is essential that you scour it for abnormalities.

The gist of the Facebook scam with Photo Notification revolves around the email that claims one of your friends added a photo of you. The email is somewhat slick as it features a Facebook-like blue headline and greeting. The click button—the tab that ultimately triggers the new Facebook scam with Photo Notification—reads “view photo with you in the attachment.”

Needless to say, if you receive the email, do not click the “view button.” If this email is perpetually sent to your inbox you should check with Facebook Security to be advised to any additional protection measures. Never open any attachment if you do not know the sender.

The new Facebook scam with Photo Notification is a new strain of malware identified by various Internet security firms as Troj/Agent-XNN. If you click on the infected link, which again is disguised as a Facebook notification email, you will open a malware-containing ZIP that allows hackers to gain control over your Windows-operated computers.

Facebook scams often appear to be constructed under different guises; however, the crux of the cyber-attacks possesses a common threat—malware is always hidden under catchy phrases or notification alerts that aim to trigger your attention. “See who is looking at your profile!” Or in this case “your friend added a new photo with you to the album.” The primary difference between the Facebook scam with Photo Notification email and a tagging email sent by the actual company is that Facebook will tell you which friend tagged you, whereas the scam email will not provide actual names of your friends.

Although Facebook scams--which use the popular social networking site as the primary duping mechanism-- are cleverly-crafted, there is one simple defense to prevent the infiltration of harmful software on your computer—simply do not click on any emails from senders you do not know.

Comments

comments

Share

Related Articles


Read previous post:
Phishing Explained

Close